Wayside Waifs’ new canine behavior center is featured in this month’s Rolling Stone magazine. Boomer and Selma are best friends. When they have the chance to play, they are really after it. Both dogs are part of a new behavior program at Wayside Waifs, which is one of only two in the country. It’s so important that it was recently featured in this month’s Rolling Stone magazine. “My mom went out and bought seven copies,” said Alison Reder, vice president of animal welfare at Wayside Waifs. “That should tell you how cool it was.” The shelter is featured for its new canine behavior center. The program helps dogs with behavioral issues overcome them so they can be adopted. “We hope people will read this article and say, ‘How can I help?’ Reder said. She said she hopes the story will encourage people to volunteer, adopt pets, or even adopt more of those who go through this program. “You can see their body language changing and you can see dogs that had no manners now on impulse control,” Reder said. At any one time, 22 animals are participating in the program and dozens more are waiting nearby. “People need to know what happens to dogs. Why some dogs stay here so long. Why some of these dogs weren’t adopted,” Reder said. She said she hopes people will turn the pages of Rolling Stone’s article, the message of what the shelter is doing will be strong.” What we do matters. It makes a difference. It saves lives,” Reder said.

Wayside Waifs’ new canine behavior center is featured in this month’s Rolling Stone magazine.

Boomer and Selma are best friends. When they have the chance to play, they are really after it. Both dogs are part of a new behavior program at Wayside Waifs, which is one of only two in the country. It’s so important that it was recently featured in this month’s Rolling Stone magazine.

“My mom went out and bought seven copies,” said Alison Reder, vice president of animal welfare at Wayside Waifs. “That should tell you how cool it was.”

The shelter is featured for its new canine behavior center. The program helps dogs with behavioral issues overcome them so they can be adopted.

“We hope people will read this article and say, ‘How can I help?’ said Reder.

She said she hopes the story will encourage people to volunteer, adopt pets, or even adopt more of those who go through this program.

“You can see their body language changing and you can see dogs that used to have no manners now have a bit of impulse control,” Reder said.

At any given time, 22 animals are on the program and dozens more are waiting nearby.

“People need to know what’s happening to dogs. Why some dogs stay here so long. Why some of these dogs weren’t adopted,” Reder said.

She said she hoped that when people turn the pages of the Rolling Stone article, the message of what the shelter does will be strong.

“What we do matters. It makes a difference. It saves lives,” Reder said.