I have been collecting prints for as long as I can remember. My approach is neither scientific nor anchored in the history of art. In short, if I like it and it makes me happy, I buy it.

When I am in a foreign country, I buy a print in memory of the holidays. Our Balinese print reminds me of our honeymoon, a flower print reminds me of memories of Copenhagen … and then there’s the bike poster we brought back from Australia only to realize they sold exactly the same in the National Gallery of Ireland gift shop.

I also like to frame smaller prints that mean something to me, whether it’s the little fox card my brother gave me when my son was born or the name of the place where we got married. They all have a place on the wall of our gallery.

The best advice before hanging pictures: use the paper insert inside their frames or cut the frame sizes out of newspaper and tape them to the wall to see if you like the look of your arrangement – before you go make some huge holes in your walls.

Of course, you don’t have to leave these shores to find a gorgeous piece for your home. Ireland is full of fantastic printers. Here are five of them you need on your wall.

Shane O’Driscoll

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I came across Corkonian Shane O’Driscoll through his murals, which have appeared on my Instagram feed multiple times. You might recognize his work because it uses very distinctive circles, colors and shapes.

Heavily influenced by beach culture and his working time in a surf shop, he has recently felt the call of the sea and returned to his hometown of Cork where he can often spend 12 straight hours in his art studio.

His prints are named after the lyrics – but don’t expect Hit me one more time baby, more like Midnight in a perfect world by DJ Shadow. And despite shutting down his studio during Covid, Shane told me he found himself “very creative in different projects,” adding that he was ultimately able to make some pieces that he had rejected in the past.

Personally, I love his recent typography print for The Irish Design Shop which sells for € 90. Its prices start at 290 € at sofinearditions.

Niamh gillespie

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An NCAD graduate Niamh Gillespie spent 15 years working in London where she built an impressive resume designing prints for Paul Smith, Alexander McQueen and Topshop, to name a few.

A burning desire to return to Ireland led her to get up and leave the bright lights of London for Co. Louth where she runs her Niamh Gillespie design studio. Her typographic prints of GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS at STAY HOME were a huge hit.

Not one to sit on her laurels, she now also designs gorgeous silk scarves under her brand Tidings, inspired by a message in a bottle she found on the shore. Prints range from € 58 to € 150 at Niamh Gillespie Design.

Fuchsia MacAree

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Carlingford artist Fuchsia MacAree is well known in design circles. You probably know his work from his humorous editorial prints for Irish weather or Christmas stocking filler from The great Irish time delivered. I remember seeing her ‘Pretty Woman, Big Mistake’ poster and had a little laugh to myself in the Jam Art Factory in Dublin.

Fuchsia’s latest exhibition at the Hang Tough Gallery explored how, during Covid, we moved away from material things and appreciated the simple little details that were right in front of us. She also told us that “a sense of humor is important” in her work and that she is inspired by the famous modern British painter David Hockney.

Fuchsia currently has an exhibition at the Hang Tough Gallery in Dublin. Her work ranges from € 18 for a smaller piece to € 110 for some of the larger ones and can be purchased at many stores including Damn Fine Print and Jam Art Prints.

Alice fitzgerald

Beginning her career at Mongrel magazine, Alice Fitzgerlad’s work is strongly influenced by the geometric shapes of her life in Dublin. His work is often described as having order and chaos side by side.

I love her use of color and her style is so unique that I can often compare a piece by Alice Fitzgerald to that of another artist. Alice’s work can be found in the permanent collection of Dublin City Council offices and if you’re one of the lucky ones to stay at The Dean in Cork, her work lights up the walls of their hotel.

In her own words, Alice’s work “demonstrates playful interactions between color, form and form”. She currently appreciates the work of “young Irish artists such as Deirdre Breen and Shane O’Driscoll”.

Alice’s raffles start at € 30 at www.alicefitzgerald.ie.

Sally caulwell

The botanical prints by Dublin-based Sally Caulwell have been on my wishlist for some time. I love the simplicity of its graphics and the way it brings the image back to its most basic form.

Sally says she is immensely inspired by nature and often picks up items from hedges and starts drawing them immediately. Sally explained her design process to me: “I like playing with geometry, distilling things down to simple shapes. Nothing makes me happier than a balanced composition. I like the repetition, the pattern, the color.

I particularly like his prints Hedgerows of Ireland and Woodland of Ireland. His illustrations can also be found in The Great Irish Farm Book. Prices start at € 28 in the Irish Design Shop. They are also available at Forest and Flock Bantry and Ardmore Pottery & Gallery.